North Carolina’s Letters About Literature Winners Announced

North Carolina’s Letters About Literature Winners Announced

CHARLOTTE, NC (June 6, 2019) – The North Carolina Center for the Book, a program of the North Carolina Humanities Council, is pleased to announce the 2019 winners for the state-wide Letters About Literature competition. The competition asks students in grades 4-12 to read a book, poem, or speech and write to the author about how the work affected them.

Out of the hundreds of entries received, the selected North Carolina winners are:

  • Level I (grades 4-6): Annika Deedy – “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley (Greensboro, NC)
  • Level II (grades 7-8): Ruby Blue – “The Veldt by Ray Bradburry (Weaverville, NC)
  • Level III (grades 9-12): Huda HaqueOut of My Mind by Sharon Draper (Morrisville NC)

To read their winning submissions, please visit our website.

All state winners receive a cash prize from the North Carolina Humanities Council and are advanced to the national round for a chance at winning $2,000. National winners will be announced by the Library of Congress in spring 2019.

Now in its 26th year, more than one million students from across the nation have participated in the Library of Congress’ Letters About Literature contest.

Press contact: Melanie Moore |North Carolina Humanities Council
(704) 687-1520 | mmoore@nchumanities.org

 

About the North Carolina Center for the Book: The North Carolina Center for the Book is a program of the North Carolina Humanities Council and is an affiliate of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. Through a variety of program formats and initiatives, the NC Center works to foster an interest in books, reading, libraries, and North Carolina’s literary heritage. The North Carolina Humanities Council began operating the NC Center in 2018.

About North Carolina Humanities Council: The North Carolina Humanities Council is a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Through grant-making and public humanities programs, the Council serves as an advocate for lifelong learning and thoughtful dialogue about our shared human experience. To learn more visit www.nchumanities.org