Let's Talk About It

Let's Talk About It

Let's Talk About It is a library discussion series that brings scholars and community members together to explore how selected books, films, or poetry illuminate a particular theme.

The Let's Talk About It (LTAI) series is administrated by the North Carolina Humanities Council in cooperation with the North Carolina Center for the Book. Let's Talk About It is available as a book, film or poetry series.

Click here for cycle deadlines and how to apply

Book Series: Designed as a nine-week reading and discussion series that includes five books. Sessions are typically held every other week and led by a new scholar each week.

Film Series: Designed as a six-week film and discussion series. Sessions are typically held weekly and led by one scholar.

Poetry Series: Designed as a six-week reading-audio/video-discussion program. Sessions are typically held weekly and led by one scholar.

Click here for more information

Click here for cycle deadlines and how to apply

Participating Libraries Winter-Spring 2017

Participating Libraries Fall 2016

Let’s Talk About It is a joint project of the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the North Carolina Center for the Book, a program of the State Library of North Carolina/Department of Cultural Resources and an affiliate of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.                

Where were you in World War II?
Weekly film screenings, lectures, reading, and discussions will deepen participants' understanding of the history of World War II and the war's impact on our world today...

The American West offers not one story but many. Together as we read these books, we will examine some of those stories - violent or nostalgic, tragic or heroic. This series will offer us a way of exploring a more honest creation myth,...

What it means to be black in the twentieth century and what the relationship is between black and white America is explored in these stories united by two themes: the quest for identity and the quest to understand the past.

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By 1861, ideas about what America was and what it meant to be an American - the essence of nationalism - led to civil war. In this series, we will consider the price of sectional reconciliation as well as what the Civil WarÕs legacy is...

The books chosen for this series suggest the ways in which human experience is shaped, even defined, by place. They are set in an urban ghetto (Brothers and Keepers), along one of the great scenic rivers in North America (A...

In this series, we will explore one of the most puzzling features of the human condition - romantic love. Whether destructive or redemptive, romantic love has the potential to transform us in some way, however briefly.

The shared past of these authors is the Civil War and its aftermath which gave North Carolina a distinctive history, literature, music, and lifestyle. We will find common motifs in this series including attachment to place as well as...

As the art and literature of the past 150 years reveal, the railway has had a profound impact on Americans’ sense of mobility and range of opportunities and on their thinking about time and distance. Making Tracks, part of the...

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the National Endowment for the Humanities and American Library Association have awarded the North Carolina Humanities Council a grant for a new Let's Talk About It series,...

During the twentieth century the American presidency became the most powerful office in the world. The basis for the power inhered in the extraordinary natural wealth of the United States, in a dynamic economy that operated within an...