Let's Talk About It

Let's Talk About It

Let's Talk About It is a library discussion series that brings scholars and community members together to explore how selected books, films, or poetry illuminate a particular theme.

The Let's Talk About It (LTAI) series is administrated by the North Carolina Humanities Council in cooperation with the North Carolina Center for the Book. Let's Talk About It is available as a book, film or poetry series.

Click here for cycle deadlines and how to apply

Book Series: Designed as a nine-week reading and discussion series that includes five books. Sessions are typically held every other week and led by a new scholar each week.

Film Series: Designed as a six-week film and discussion series. Sessions are typically held weekly and led by one scholar.

Poetry Series: Designed as a six-week reading-audio/video-discussion program. Sessions are typically held weekly and led by one scholar.

Click here for more information

Click here for cycle deadlines and how to apply

Participating Libraries Winter-Spring 2018

Participating Libraries Fall 2017

Participating Libraries Summer 2017

Participating Libraries Winter-Spring 2017

Let’s Talk About It is a joint project of the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the North Carolina Center for the Book, a program of the State Library of North Carolina/Department of Cultural Resources and an affiliate of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.                

Sometimes historical facts alone are not enough to evoke the truth of the past -- perhaps this is what Walt Whitman meant when he claimed of the Civil War that 'the real war will never get into the books.' In these selections...

Since the establishment of New World colonies by Europeans, America has been seen as a grand experiment. The very size and geographic diversity of the country reinforce notions of greatness and power and potential.

In the mid-twentieth century, both Latin American and Latino writers bagan to attract wide audiences in countries throughout the world. This series allows us to hear voices that speak in several different languages, introducing us to...

This series will offer us the opportunity to reflect on "scientific" predictions that often can be disturbingly accurate and to examine our attitudes toward science and its societal by-products.

By 1861, ideas about what America was and what it meant to be an American - the essence of nationalism - led to civil war. In this series, we will consider the price of sectional reconciliation as well as what the Civil WarÕs legacy is...

As novelist, essayist, teacher, editor, and publisher, no single figure has done more to “discover” the literary South than Louis Rubin. So it is appropriate to name this series in his honor. The books in this series were published...

This video series provides outstanding visual interpretations of the poetry of 13 modern American poets including Robert Frost, Ezra Pound, Langston Hughes and Emily Dickinson.

These hour-long videos were originally broadcast as...

The shared past of these authors is the Civil War and its aftermath which gave North Carolina a distinctive history, literature, music, and lifestyle. We will find common motifs in this series including attachment to place as well as...

In this series, readers explore ancient and modern conflicts to build understanding about the varied and richly textured peoples, cultures, histories, and geographies of the Middle East. A place of divergent cultures, faiths, and people...

During the twentieth century the American presidency became the most powerful office in the world. The basis for the power inhered in the extraordinary natural wealth of the United States, in a dynamic economy that operated within an...