Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply to be a Host Site:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under "How to Apply" on this                  website or download them here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and                         speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. 

STEP 4: Complete and submit the Road Scholars Program Host Site Application at                   least 60 days prior to your intended event date.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

If you would like more information on applying to host a Road Scholars presentation please contact the Program Coordinator, Caitlin Patton, at cpatton@nchumanities.org or (704) 687-1521.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

In this program, Joseph Bathanti examines, through his own published work and other texts, strategies of “telling” that have come to be known as autobiographical. The focus of this program is on how the idiosyncratic “I”  and the...

Scott Mason is WRAL-TV's Tar Heel Traveler, whose feature stories air Monday through Thursday at 5:55 PM. Scott has featured many sports stories since his series debuted in 2007--sports such as football, basketball, baseball and hockey...

Kwanzaa, an African American and Pan African holiday, was created in 1966 by Dr.

Many interwoven issues face Native Americans today. Although these are contemporary issues, they have grown out of the long and often bitter history of contact between Native Americans and the newer Americans. Dr. Stanley Knick...

This session examines the faces of Latino women during their process of creating a new home in the South. Using the art of storytelling and music, Irania will touch base on the subjects of identity, cultural conflicts in all their...

The playwright has been a shaman in the community since scrawled cave walls and etched stone have conveyed history. Even today, wise men still perform their prophecies around the fire. From Aborigine processions, to Shakespeare’s...

In 1922, the former slave and Union Army veteran William Henry Singleton published an autobiography that provides a fascinating glimpse of life in a North Carolina coastal city and rural neighborhood. His Recollections of My...

For more than 450 years, shipwrecks shaped the destiny of NC’s Outer Banks, creating one of the most intriguing histories and cultures in America. Kevin Duffus, author of the 2007 book Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks

Civil rights activist Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987) is best known for her role in developing the Citizenship Schools. During the 1950s and 1960s, thousands of disenfranchised African Americans passed through Citizenship School...

African Americans have played an integral role in the creation and development of the United States from the colonial period to the present.  Since 1619 when the first twenty Africans were brought to the shores of the Chesapeake to...