Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 60 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars Program Guidelines for details on eligibility and expectations for host sites. Common program FAQs are listed here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. Please note, the Council is currently only accepting applications for events taking place between 11/1/19-10/31/20.

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions. Need a refresher on how to navigate your Applicant Dashboard? Click here for a video tour!

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below. We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and reports.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. You can watch this video to learn the steps to creating your account. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2020 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/19-10/31/20)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. You can watch this video to learn how to complete the online application form. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2020 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/19-10/31/20)" and complete the form.
  • New applicant? Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one phone consultations with Programs Coordinator Melissa Giblin to discuss the program and application process. Please click here to schedule a phone consultation.  

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

There are approximately seven million Muslims in the United States. These men and women come from all walks of life and from a range of ethnic and racial backgrounds. This presentation will help audiences better understand Islam in all...

In 1914, women on North Carolina’s home front stood poised to offer aid to war-ravaged Europeans because they were already organized to provide resources to the needy and vulnerable in their own communities. Women club members and...

In twentieth century America, volumes have been written about art with discussions of craft often an afterthought. For those whose primary interest is focused on three-dimensional objects, there is no specific language or system of...

            More than 10,000 German prisoners of war were interned in eighteen camps in North Carolina during World War II. Yet apart from the guards, civilian workers, and FBI and...

Gerald White Johnson (1890-1980), born in Riverton (near Wagram in Scotland County), was a giant among American scholars, friend and colleague of famous author H.L.

The history of NC's textile industry includes jobs migration, labor unions, and globalization, all of which parallel manufacturing industries throughout the world today. This program focuses on NC's rich textile heritage as told...

In this presentation, Douglas Jackson gives a historical perspective on the Central Interscholastic Athletic Association, formerly the Colored Interscholastic Athletic Association. Included are examinations of how local and regional...

With musical accompaniment (songs sung with guitar accompaniment and/or CD recordings throughout the talk), Susan Ketchin explores through lively lecture, storytelling, and humor the role that southern music and religion have...

Much has been said, and is currently being said about climate change. Opponents of taking action claim they have valid scientific evidence that refutes humans are causing what we are witnessing in our climate today. This presentation...

In this presentation Hardy will focus on the Civil War’s regional impact along the North Carolina-Tennessee board. In June 1864, East Tennessee Unionist George W. Kirk led a raid through the Toe River Valley and into Burke County, NC...