Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply to be a Host Site:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under "How to Apply" on this                  website or download them here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and                         speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. 

STEP 4: Complete and submit the Road Scholars Program Host Site Application at                   least 60 days prior to your intended event date.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

If you would like more information on applying to host a Road Scholars presentation please contact the Program Coordinator, Caitlin Patton, at cpatton@nchumanities.org or (704) 687-1521.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Over the last 40 years, the South has experienced social and economic change at a dizzying pace. During this period, the South was transformed from a poor region that was still in many respects “the Nation’s number one economic problem...

Cora Wilson Stewart was one of the most widely known authorities on adult illiteracy in the United States during the first third of the twentieth century. Long before it became popular to decry the problem of adult illiteracy, she...

For much of the twentieth century, North Carolina enjoyed a reputation as the most progressive state in the American South. In 1949, the preeminent political scientist V. O. Key labeled the state a progressive plutocracy and...

The American Civil War commands as much interest and intrigue today as it has since the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9, 1865.  Much of that interest lies in the enduring need, especially of Confederate...

Though the Civil Rights Movement is often framed by events of the 1950s and 1960s, the struggle for political and social rights for African Americans actually stretches back nearly 150 years. North Carolinians were involved in the...

With musical accompaniment (songs sung with guitar accompaniment and/or CD recordings throughout the talk), Susan Ketchin explores through lively lecture, storytelling, and humor the role that southern music and religion have...

The Plott bear hound is the official state dog of North Carolina and is widely recognized as one of the world's premier big game hunting hounds. The breed is unique in many ways, including its Germanic origins, distinctive appearance,...

Following the Civil War, opportunities for former slaves to enter law, medicine, teaching, and other professions increased greatly. Several medical schools graduated a number of African American physicians in the late nineteenth century...

What does it mean to be disabled? What does it mean to be abled? This talk explores the meaning of disability in contemporary society and ways of thinking about disability that go beyond the “super-crip” or overcoming narrative. Dr. Ken...

During the 20th century, North Carolina poets recorded in verse many of the crucial perceptions, dreams, experiences, and concerns which swirled about them. From profound social issues to the quietest personal moments, from...