Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply to be a Host Site:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under "How to Apply" on this                  website or download them here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and                         speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. 

STEP 4: Complete and submit the Road Scholars Program Host Site Application at                   least 60 days prior to your intended event date.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

If you would like more information on applying to host a Road Scholars presentation please contact the Program Coordinator, Caitlin Patton, at cpatton@nchumanities.org or (704) 687-1521.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

At dawn on September 22, 1711, over five hundred Tuscarora, Core, Neuse, Pamlico, Weetock, Machapunga, and Bear River Indian warriors swept down on the unsuspecting settlers living along Neuse and...

Dorothea Lange, a documentary photographer during the depression, is best known for her images of the dust-bowl migration to California. Her image, “Migrant Mother,” while emblematic of depression era struggles also brings to mind...

With its reputation as a “basketball state with a football problem,” sports remain a prominent aspect of life in the Tar Heel state. Generations of participants, spectators, fans and critics have debated its importance, and while some...

In this presentation audiences will be drawn in to the story of the American Revolution in the south. The talk on this campaign can focus on three principle areas from Jones’ book Before they were Heroes at King’s Mountain:

1....

When World War II broke out, African Americans were still relegated to service in the U.S. Navy at mess rank only. B-1, a 45-piece band comprised...

The lecture draws upon Waters' Doctoral research and examines community development among African Americans, primarily in Asheville and Western North Carolina.  The presentation also juxtaposes Western North Carolina with...

In the 1930s and 1940s, a triple whammy of outside forces arrived in Appalachia and restructured our mountain society forever. These forces were the Great Depression, World War II, and the chestnut blight. Folklorist Charlotte Ross...

Museums preserve culture, but equally they shape it, determining not only what gets saved for future generations but how we understand and value our collective past and present.  Traditionally, museums told stories about...

Market hunter, frontier guide, wilderness scout, master woodsman, expert marksman, Indian fighter, militia leader, surveyor, land speculator, judge, sheriff, coroner, elected legislator, merchant, tavern keeper, prisoner of war, Spanish...

Thomas Babington Macaulay asserts in the essay “On John Dryden” that the “English Bible, a book which, if anything else in our language should perish, would alone suffice to show the whole extent of its beauty and power.” To some people...