Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply to be a Host Site:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under "How to Apply" on this                  website or download them here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and                         speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the requested 

STEP 4: Complete and submit the Road Scholars Program Host Site Application at                   least 60 days prior to your intended event date.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

If you would like more information on applying to host a Road Scholars presentation please contact the Program Coordinator, Caitlin Patton, at cpatton@nchumanities.org or (704) 687-1521.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

In the post-Civil War South, North Carolina’s women had an increasing presence in courtrooms. Viewed as dependents and frequently characterized as victims, women were traditionally granted certain protections by the law, including the...

For more than 450 years, shipwrecks shaped the destiny of NC’s Outer Banks, creating one of the most intriguing histories and cultures in America. Kevin Duffus, author of the 2007 book Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks

We will discuss the historical stereotypes of Southern women that went into the creation of the character Scarlett O’Hara, especially as portrayed in the 1939 film of Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone With the Wind. Then we...

Translating biblical texts is a difficult undertaking. Differences in the translation of sacred texts help to shape and reshape their meanings for us. Errors that have occurred in this process range from the sublime to the ridiculous....

The Exposition of 1884 served as North Carolina's debut as a progressive member of the New South, with a focus on promoting investments in and expansion of new industries. While this would appear the particular domain of men, women were...

The Bread Family tales is a collection of stories, photos, and foot-stomping music focusing on the daily life and struggles of a family living when Jim Crow laws and racism were prevalent. Storyteller Elisha Minter, affectionately known...

Dorothea Lange, a documentary photographer during the depression, is best known for her images of the dust-bowl migration to California. Her image, “Migrant Mother,” while emblematic of depression era struggles also brings to mind...

Nowhere is the rich cultural diversity of the American South more evident than in its music. From the high, lonesome sound emanating from Appalachian hollers to the “lowdown shaking chill” of blues performers in Delta juke joints,...

In 1922, the former slave and Union Army veteran William Henry Singleton published an autobiography that provides a fascinating glimpse of life in a North Carolina coastal city and rural neighborhood. His Recollections of My...

With historic photographs, drawings and maps, maritime historian Kevin Duffus presents a wide-ranging discussion of North Carolina's rich heritage of guiding mariners, a tradition which surprisingly began nearly five centuries ago.Learn...