Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

  • STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under “Road Scholars Program Eligibility and FAQs” on this website or download them here.
  • STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.
  • STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. 
  • STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions
  • STEP 5: Complete and submit the online application  at least 60 days prior to your intended event date. Note: We recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and materials. Note: We are currently accepting funding applications for our 2018 fiscal year (for events between Nov. 1 2017 - Oct. 31, 2018). 

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

Still have questions? Please reach out to Caitlin Patton at cpatton@nchumanities.org or call her at (704) 687-1521

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

At dawn on September 22, 1711, over five hundred Tuscarora, Core, Neuse, Pamlico, Weetock, Machapunga, and Bear River Indian warriors swept down on the unsuspecting settlers living along Neuse and...

In this presentation, Douglas Jackson gives a historical perspective on the Central Interscholastic Athletic Association, formerly the Colored Interscholastic Athletic Association. Included are examinations of how local and regional...

Much has been said, and is currently being said about climate change. Opponents of taking action claim they have valid scientific evidence that refutes humans are causing what we are witnessing in our climate today. This presentation...

In this presentation by history educator Laurel Sneed, the audience will learn about three courageous African American Tar Heels who escaped to freedom and authored slave narratives: Harriet Jacobs, of Edenton; Moses Roper, of Caswell...

In 1914, women on North Carolina’s home front stood poised to offer aid to war-ravaged Europeans because they were already organized to provide resources to the needy and vulnerable in their own communities. Women club members and...

This session examines the faces of Latino women during their process of creating a new home in the South. Using the art of storytelling and music, Irania will touch base on the subjects of identity, cultural conflicts in all their...

The Exposition of 1884 served as North Carolina's debut as a progressive member of the New South, with a focus on promoting investments in and expansion of new industries. While this would appear the particular domain of men, women were...

Documentary producer, Ken Burns called our national parks, “America’s best idea.”  With ten million visitors annually, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most popular in the nation. Here in NC, many think a park in the...

In 1969, Congress established a federal program of funding public art.  Since that time public sculpture has increasingly been manifestested in cities and towns throughout this country.  Maryrose Carroll has been part of that...

Over the last 40 years, the South has experienced social and economic change at a dizzying pace. During this period, the South was transformed from a poor region that was still in many respects “the Nation’s number one economic problem...