Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply to be a Host Site:

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with your selected scholar prior to applying to select a date and time for the intended event.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

Still have questions? Please reach out to Caitlin Patton at cpatton@nchumanities.org or call her at (704) 687-1521

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

The Bread Family tales is a collection of stories, photos, and foot-stomping music focusing on the daily life and struggles of a family living when Jim Crow laws and racism were prevalent. Storyteller Elisha Minter, affectionately known...

Chagall's relationship to Israel, as cited by his biographers, was thought to have come from a 1931 commission he received to do a series of illustrations for the Bible. Actually, the trip which he made to Palestine before the State of...

Nineteenth- and early twentieth-century writers and travelers such as Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles Dudley Warner, Constance Fenimore Woolson, Margaret Morley, and Christian Reid tell of the “Land of the Sky,” a destination...

Once Southern men marched off to war, women were called on to become the mother’s of invention and fill jobs men once occupied. The realities of war...

Hitler declared war on the United States on Dec. 11, 1941 – four days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  German U-boats soon began crossing the Atlantic and sinking American shipping along the North Carolina coast. ...

About every 30 years, some scholar “discovers” George Moses Horton, the first black man to publish a book while living as a slave. Usually, the new fame is short lived. Marjorie Hudson, whose farm is within five miles of Horton’s...

Following the Civil War, opportunities for former slaves to enter law, medicine, teaching, and other professions increased greatly. Several medical schools graduated a number of African American physicians in the late nineteenth century...

This presentation examines the relationship between health and traditional American Indian diets. The scholar draws on the connections among three elements of pre-Colonial American Indian society – diet, sassafras, and isolation – to...

Museums preserve culture, but equally they shape it, determining not only what gets saved for future generations but how we understand and value our collective past and present.  Traditionally, museums told stories about...

Original, unpublished documents and correspondence from gifted Sandhills women provide unique and fascinating perspectives of the beginning, middle, and end of the Civil War period in North Carolina. An initially uplifting, idealistic...