Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

  • STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under “Road Scholars Program Eligibility and FAQs” on this website or download them here.
  • STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.
  • STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. 
  • STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions
  • STEP 5: Complete and submit the online application  at least 60 days prior to your intended event date. Note: We recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and materials. Note: We are currently accepting funding applications for our 2018 fiscal year (for events between Nov. 1 2017 - Oct. 31, 2018). 

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

Still have questions? Please reach out to Caitlin Patton at cpatton@nchumanities.org or call her at (704) 687-1521

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

In this program, Joseph Bathanti examines, through his own published work and other texts, strategies of “telling” that have come to be known as autobiographical. The focus of this program is on how the idiosyncratic “I”  and the...

Although most people are familiar with how the Native Americans adopted white man’s culture and became Americanized, many are not aware of what we borrowed from the Indians. Native Americans affected virtually every aspect of...

Orphan Trains resettled some 250,000 children from crowded eastern cities to rural areas of the United States from 1853 to 1929. The program, though well-intentioned, was not without its critics.

A lifelong history buff and...

The American Civil War commands as much interest and intrigue today as it has since the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9, 1865.  Much of that interest lies in the enduring need, especially of Confederate...

Researching the enigmatic 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson in preparation for writing her own solo play Emily, Connie Clark discovered an extraordinary woman quite different from the meek mouse dressed in...

African Americans have played an integral role in the creation and development of the United States from the colonial period to the present.  Since 1619 when the first twenty Africans were brought to the shores of the Chesapeake to...

In 2002, filmmaker and author, Kevin Duffus, solved the long-standing mystery of the missing, first-order Fresnel lens from the 1803 Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, lost for 140 years. The French-manufactured lens, considered to be “a...

Cora Wilson Stewart was one of the most widely known authorities on adult illiteracy in the United States during the first third of the twentieth century. Long before it became popular to decry the problem of adult illiteracy, she...

Blending interviews, readings, lecture, and performed and recorded music, Susan Ketchin explores the role that religion has played in shaping the imaginations of some of the greatest southern writers living today. Through this lively...

This lecture is devoted to the artist's unique ability to express himself in several media: tapestry, mosaic, stained glass, lithographs, ceramics, book illustrations and oil paintings. Jacobson has selected ten works, each one a...