Road Scholars

Road Scholars

As of July 14, 2020, the North Carolina Humanities Council retired the Road Scholars program.

The North Carolina Humanities Council thanks the many scholars who participated in this program and those who attended and supported this program with their gifts.

We believe that knowledge builds community and through our grant programs we will continue to embolden and encourage public humanities scholars and community organizations to work together to reimagine and create new public humanities programs that are community centric. Click here for more information and to learn if you are eligible for North Carolina Humanities Council grant opportunities.

If you have questions about scholar resources please contact our Executive Director, Sherry Paula Watkins at spwatkins@nchumanities.org and cc Executive Assistant Megan Byrd at mbyrd@nchumanities.org.

COVID-19 Update:  

Unfortunately, due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic the Council has canceled all Road Scholar Speakers Bureau events through October 31, 2020 and will not be offering rescheduling options. We recognize the difficulties that may result from canceled events and appreciate your flexibility, cooperation and understanding.

 

From 1990-2020 the North Carolina Humanities Council supported public humanities lectures for adults through our Road Scholars Speakers Bureau

Our Road Scholars program catalog explored the nuances of identity and community with presentations by over 60 speakers which focused on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Some lectures focused on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examined broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explored the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by hosts of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

What are the connections between writing, thinking, and living? From Augustine to Rousseau, from John Stuart Mill to W.E.B. DuBois, and from Bertrand Russell to Simone de Beauvoir, philosophers have used autobiographical writing to...

Over the last 40 years, the South has experienced social and economic change at a dizzying pace. During this period, the South was transformed from a poor region that was still in many respects “the Nation’s number one economic problem...

At dawn on September 22, 1711, over five hundred Tuscarora, Core, Neuse, Pamlico, Weetock, Machapunga, and Bear River Indian warriors swept down on the unsuspecting settlers living along Neuse and...

During WWII the German navy used a cipher machine called Enigma to encipher and decipher messages. The machine was onboard of the U-85, one of the U-boats operating off the coast of the Outer Banks, and went down with the ship when...

Why are North Carolinians called Tar Heels? This history program examines the practices and context of the North Carolina naval stores industry from its beginnings in 1705 through its decline in 1950. Brayan Avery and a team of...

The story of North Carolina begins in the east. In this lecture audiences will learn about the lives of the Native American, African, and European inhabitants of the state over its 400 years of recorded history. These peoples have not...

The removal of the Cherokee Nation from its homeland in the Southeast to a new territory beyond the Mississippi remains a compelling and controversial event in United States history. The Cherokee, more than any other Native American...

Using visual examples, Dr. Coronado’s presentation offers a detailed explanation of how a costume goes from germ of an idea to an actual stage garment.  To set the stage for this lecture, Dr. Coronado explains out how costumes fit...

Kwanzaa, an African American and Pan African holiday, was created in 1966 by Dr.

Hitler declared war on the United States on Dec. 11, 1941 – four days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  German U-boats soon began crossing the Atlantic and sinking American shipping along the North Carolina coast. ...