Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under “Road Scholars Program Eligibility and FAQs” on this website or download them here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. 

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2018 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/17-10/31/18)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2018 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/17-10/31/18)" and complete the form.
  • Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one application coaching sessions. Please reach out to Caitlin Patton at cpatton@nchumanities.org or (704) 687-1521.

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event. The Council is currently ONLY accepting funding applications for our 2018 fiscal year (for events between Nov. 1 2017 - Oct. 31, 2018).

We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and materials.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

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