Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars Program Guidelines for details on eligibility and expectations for host sites. Common program FAQs are listed here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. Please note, the Council is currently only accepting applications for events taking place 11/1/18-10/31/19.

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions. Need a refresher on how to navigate your Applicant Dashboard? Click here for a video tour!

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below. We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and reports.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. You can watch this video to learn the steps to creating your account. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/18-10/31/19)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. You can watch this video to learn how to complete the online application form. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/18-10/31/19)" and complete the form.
  • New applicant? Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one phone consultations with Programs Coordinator, Melissa Giblin to discuss the program and application process. Please click here to schedule a phone consultation.  

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

With musical accompaniment (songs sung with guitar accompaniment and/or CD recordings throughout the talk), Susan Ketchin explores through lively lecture, storytelling, and humor the role that southern music and religion have...

The American Civil War commands as much interest and intrigue today as it has since the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9, 1865.  Much of that interest lies in the enduring need, especially of Confederate...

Music is both an artistic and cultural product that allows groups and individuals to communicate identity, history and story. By examining the musical aesthetics and cultural context of a piece audiences today can appreciate the...

The First Amendment of the United State Constitution provides a guarantee of freedom of speech, however, some of the great titles in American literature have been censored including books by Mark Twain, (Huckleberry Finn), J. D...

This program explores how slavery and oppression deconstruct the traditional image of motherhood and manhood for the black man and woman, a dynamic which is clearly defined in characters such as Toni Morrison’s Sethe and Paul D. and...

With historic photographs, drawings and maps, maritime historian Kevin Duffus presents a wide-ranging discussion of North Carolina's rich heritage of guiding mariners, a tradition which surprisingly began nearly five centuries ago.Learn...

This program examines the life of James Longstreet, who, despite his stellar record as a corps commander in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, became one of the most vilified figures in the postbellum South. How much of the...

Sam Ervin is most often remembered as the affable, Bible-quoting, old country lawyer who chaired the Senate Watergate hearings in 1973. The senator’s moonshiner stories from “down home” in NC, his quaint verses ranging from Shakespeare...

John Charles McNeill’s poetry features the landscapes of the Sandhills of NC. The setting for his poetry includes Scotland, Richmond, Moore, Hoke, Cumberland, and Robeson counties. McNeill, skilled in the oral tradition

The story of the discovery and rise to fame of this teenager from Tupelo parallels the musical interaction between black and white communities defining American popular music from the early 1800s to the present day.