Contemporary Culture

A Just War? Ethical Issues in the War on Terror

Should war be limited by ethics? Or is anything justified in time of war? Over the past ten years, the War on Terror and the war in Iraq have sparked many moral questions. How do the traditions of ethics and Just War Theory help us evaluate the rationale for war, military conduct during war, the treatment of prisoners, and the effect of war on soldiers and civilians?

Requirements: 
microphone

The Language of Film: How We Are Manipulated By Media

Walk into any room full of people and ask how many know the language of film and virtually no one will raise their hand. But it is estimated that Americans spend a minimum of four and a half hours a day watching television. The fact is, by the time we reach our teens we are so completely conversant with the conventions of film and video that we are ALL unconscious experts.
This lecture seeks to examine how the creators of media use that unconscious knowledge to manipulate the viewer: sometimes to entertain, and sometimes for motives not quite so benevolent.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone, DVD player, CD player, writeable board

The Many Faces of Islam: Beyond the Headlines

There are approximately seven million Muslims in the United States. These men and women come from all walks of life and from a range of ethnic and racial backgrounds. This presentation will help audiences better understand Islam in all its diversity in the US and abroad. Who are these Muslims in America and how are they perceived by non-Muslims? What is the history of Islam and what are some of the major challenges facing Americans in trying to better understand the religion, both its ideals and practice? Indeed, what is the experience of being Muslim-American post-9-11?

Requirements: 
lectern, digital projection system

The Kwanzaa Experience

Kwanzaa, an African American and Pan African holiday, was created in 1966 by Dr.

Requirements: 
microphone, digital projection system, DVD player, writeable board, lectern

Trumpet and Cornet: Influences on Jazz

Douglas Jackson will examine the performance practices of trumpet and cornet jazz stylists in this presentation. Historical perspectives will be emphasized, along with demonstrations of the instruments by the presenter. The program format will include a power point presentation on selected performers based upon their contributions to transitional periods in jazz, including biographical profiles, literature, pedagogy and recordings. The historical period covered will be from 1900 to the present.

Requirements: 
Lectern, Microphone, Carousel slide projector and screen, DVD or VCR and monitor

It’s Not Just a Game: Sports and Society in North Carolina

With its reputation as a “basketball state with a football problem,” sports remain a prominent aspect of life in the Tar Heel state. Generations of participants, spectators, fans and critics have debated its importance, and while some have found the state’s fascination with sports beneficial and admirable, others have deemed it wasteful and distracting. A closer look at which events and athletes various North Carolinians have embraced and/or rejected reveals a great deal about the way people have viewed themselves and their region.

Requirements: 
Lectern

Knowing Each Other, Knowing Ourselves: Why Study Other Cultures?

The notion that America is a melting pot in which different ethnic and cultural groups lose their distinctions is under attack. Should our cultural diversity threaten our unity? America has always been a country of diverse peoples, and our ability to come together requires an understanding of culture itself. This program offers a view of traditional cultures around the world that may look different on the surface but whose similarities outnumber their differences. Dr.

Requirements: 
Chalkboard or flip-chart, lectern, microphone

Contemporary Issues Facing Native Americans

Many interwoven issues face Native Americans today. Although these are contemporary issues, they have grown out of the long and often bitter history of contact between Native Americans and the newer Americans. Dr. Stanley Knick addresses the following issues from a cultural and historical perspective: cultural diversity, stereotypes, state and federal government regulation, religious freedom, health and substance abuse, and the Pan-Indian movement.

Requirements: 
Chalkboard or flip-chart, lectern, microphone

Tiebele to Timbuktu: West Africa’s Tribal Cultures

The European conquest remains the most destructive event inflicted on Africa’s native people. However, the sudden departure of these same colonial powers was nearly as devastating. Artificially created nations replaced weakened tribal cultures, often combining traditional enemies. Toting camera and notebook, Dr. Douglas Butler traveled 700 miles through West Africa where indigenous societies have survived.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone for large room, carousel slide projector with remote control, screen

Libya: Ancient Crossroads, Modern Conundrum

Libya is more than a sea of sand atop an ocean of oil. It has been — and remains — a cultural crossroads boasting five World Heritage sites. Phoenician, Greek, and Roman ruins dot the coast; Berber fortifications and caravan stops line the desert; and 10,000-year-old Saharan rock art depicts milder and wetter climates. Since 2004 a limited number of Americans have been allowed to visit this once so-called pariah state. Dr. Douglas Butler was among the first. Accompanied by a military representative “for protection,” he nevertheless ranged widely and was allowed to photograph at will.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone for large room, carousel slide projector with remote control, screen
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