Oral and Written Storytelling

Lost and Found: Tracking the new Identity of Latino Women in the New South

This session examines the faces of Latino women during their process of creating a new home in the South. Using the art of storytelling and music, Irania will touch base on the subjects of identity, cultural conflicts in all their complexities, and the subliminal process of cultural negotiations. After the storytelling and presentation, Irania will read some examples from her chapter “One Road many Names” published in the book 27 Views of Charlotte (2014 Eno Publishing) to foster a conversation with the audience.

Requirements: 
Microphone

Childhood Across Cultures

The study of cultural differences in immigrant parents’ knowledge of child rearing and child development is particularly germane today in our diverse schools and educational settings. It is critical that educators understand the nature and composition of immigrant mothers’ knowledge of child development and child rearing. Knowing the messages, symbols and invisible childhood links English Language Learner children bring to the classroom will better equip and empower educators in their teaching strategies when working with children of immigrant parents.

Requirements: 
Microphone

Knowing the Self: Philosophy and Autobiographical Writing

What are the connections between writing, thinking, and living? From Augustine to Rousseau, from John Stuart Mill to W.E.B. DuBois, and from Bertrand Russell to Simone de Beauvoir, philosophers have used autobiographical writing to convey their ideas on the nature of reality, the meaning of human life, and the highest goals of human community. By exploring the intersection of philosophy and autobiography, we gain insights about both traditions while finding deeper meaning in our own life stories.

Requirements: 
microphone

What Makes a Southern Story Southern?

Southern stories are more than tangled tales of honeysuckle and kudzu. The thirteen states that comprise the Old South have collectively produced some of the nation’s finest writers and the past century’s most honored books.

While some insist that “authentic” Southern stories must include a dead mule, Tamra Wilson begs to differ. In this presentation she will share from her own research the six essentials that define Southern fiction and memoir. You’ll never look at Southern literature quite the same way again. 

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone, digital projector, laptop computer

Southern Selves: The Child as Storyteller

Coming-of-Age stories are regarded by some as quintessentially American, and few have succeeded as well as Harper Lee and James Agee. Both offer compelling approaches to the Southern narrative.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone, digital projector, laptop computer

Sit a Spell

In an earlier time in the history of the south, “Ya’ll come and sit-a-spell was the call for work stoppage. In the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, bone tired sharecroppers dropped cotton sacks, hoes, tobacco planters, vegetable baskets, and sometimes their bodies in the rich eastern North Carolina soil at the sound of those words. Others made it to the end of long rows and sat under shade trees or tobacco shelters. While water, Pepsi Colas, salted peanuts, nabs, honey buns, and other goodies were being passed around, weary workers sang and slapped the hambones.

Requirements: 
lectern, microphone, comfortable, wide-bodied chair

North Carolina Alive with People

Lynn Salsi presents a broad word-picture of North Carolina based on oral histories of residents she has collected for ten years. She includes stories from the Outer Banks to the Blue Ridge Parkway. This program can be presented with imagery from across the state. Or, upon advanced request, one section can be spotlighted over another. She highlights locations and people from her books: Voices of the Crystal Coast, Voices of the North Carolina Mountains, Guilford County, Heart of the Piedmont, Outer Banks Stories, and articles she has written for “Our State” magazine.

The Jack Tales, North Carolina Heritage Tales (North Carolina Storytelling Traditions)

Jack is the oldest American legendary hero. Stories about Jack arrived in America in the minds of the first settlers. Although stories were told about Jack throughout the Southern Appalachians, one family group has received recognition by the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress as having told the tales in an unbroken line of descendants since 1775. The Hicks, Harmons, and Wards, the first families to settle on the Watauga River, passed the tales down for two hundred years before they were written for everyone to enjoy.

The Tar Heel Traveler: Stories From the Road

Scott Mason may have the best job in television. He travels all over North Carolina, usually steering clear of highways and bounding instead along bumpy roads and off-beaten paths. He uncovers hidden gems everywhere he goes: people and places full of feeling and flavor—and wonder. In this presentation, he celebrates the colorful characters, out-of-the-way places, and rich history of North Carolina. He will share with audiences the stories behind the stories. North Carolina is brimming with intriguing stories.

Requirements: 
Special requirements: DVD or VCR and monitor This program may require additional costs beyond the honorarium payment. Please inquire with the scholar for specific details.

We Have Stories to Tell—Family and Personal Stories

Author and storyteller Jane Yolen states, “All humans are stories waiting to be told. My story, your story, our story—history.” In this program, Sylvia Payne encourages her audiences to realize that sometimes they may have shared stories without even realizing they had done so or that those stories may provide important links to historical events within their own families. Payne stresses the urgency of asking questions of our parents and other elders, and drawing important topics to the surface, as a pertinent way of capturing family histories.

Requirements: 
Microphone required for large room
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