U.S. and World History

General Robert E. Lee: The Autumn of His Life

While the greater part of Robert E.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone

An Introduction to the Ancient Maya

In 1839, American author and explorer John Lloyd Stephens undertook an extensive expedition through the Maya region of Central America and Mexico. The resulting publication fascinated the American public and introduced many to the wonders of the ancient Maya civilization. Today, that fascination continues. In this presentation, Solomon will give an overview of Maya culture, including its art, architecture, calendar, and writing system and will show how recent archaeological discoveries are changing our view of this complex society.

Requirements: 
Requirements: Lectern, Microphone, Projector and screen

Witness to the Holocaust

In this very personal program, Dr. Walter Ziffer informs his audience of the difficulties of surviving during the German genocide known as the Holocaust and of the importance of maintaining vigilance so as to prevent a repeat of this atrocity. The program also counteracts contemporary revisionist distortions of the Holocaust.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone

James Longstreet: Scalawag or Scapegoat?

This program examines the life of James Longstreet, who, despite his stellar record as a corps commander in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, became one of the most vilified figures in the postbellum South. How much of the abuse heaped upon General Longstreet by his fellow white Southerners was deserved and how much of it was part of the myth of the “Lost Cause?” To what extent has popular culture, with the likes of the novel The Killer Angels and the film Gettysburg, rehabilitated Longstreet’s reputation?

Douglas Freeman and the Southern Intellectual Community

This program examines the life and career of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Douglas Southall Freeman within the context of the southern intellectual community of the early twentieth century. Freeman’s work as editor of the Richmond News-Leader from 1915 to1949, and his widely acclaimed works on Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia, placed him at the forefront of the so-called Southern Renaissance of the 1930s and 1940s.

The Crusade Against Illiteracy in the United States: The Life and Times of Cora Wilson Stewart

Cora Wilson Stewart was one of the most widely known authorities on adult illiteracy in the United States during the first third of the twentieth century. Long before it became popular to decry the problem of adult illiteracy, she was leading public crusades to solve this problem. She gained national and international fame while helping thousands of adults learn the basic skills of reading and writing. In this program, Willie Nelms describes the life and times of Cora Wilson Stewart and the literacy movement.

Requirements: 
Lectern, microphone

America without Indians: An Imaginary Journey

Too often, whether it is in movies, novels, or even history books, when it comes to American history, Indians are viewed merely as interesting sideshows or as menacing nuisances, which must be pushed aside for the nation to achieve its destiny. In reality, American Indians were integral to the development of the United States, its institutions, and its history. This compelling program Dr.

Requirements: 
Lectern, screen
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