Let's Talk About It

Let's Talk About It

Let's Talk About It is a library discussion series that brings scholars and community members together to explore how selected books, films, or poetry illuminate a particular theme.

The Let's Talk About It (LTAI) is available as a book, film or poetry series.

Click here for the LTAI Project Director's Guide

Book Series: Designed as a nine-week reading and discussion series that includes five books. Sessions are typically held every other week and led by a new scholar each week.

Film Series: Designed as a six-week film and discussion series. Sessions are typically held weekly and led by one scholar.

Poetry Series: Designed as a six-week reading-audio/video-discussion program. Sessions are typically held weekly and led by one scholar.

How to Apply

Let's Talk About It series are offered in three cycles, winter-spring, summer and fall. A completed application should be submitted to the North Carolina Humanities Council by the following deadlines: 

  • Winter-Spring Cycle 2020: Applications are due by September 30, 2019. Winter-Spring series should occur January 6-April 27, 2020.
  • Summer Cycle 2020: Applications are due by March 2, 2020. Summer series must occur between May 27-August 3 2020. Please contact the Program Coordinator for more details.
  • Fall Cycle 2020: Applications are due by June 30, 2020. Fall series take place from August 26-November 17, 2020.

Submitting Your Let’s Talk About It Grant Application:

  1. Please review the Project Director's Guide
  2. Please review the available themes in our series choices and select your first and second choice series.
  3. Please review the instructions to complete your application in the Council's online application system. We have created a 5 min video tutorial and these written instructions.
  4. Complete the "Let's Talk About It" online application and submit it by the respective cycle deadline listed above.
  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Let's Talk About It Grant Program" and complete the form. 

  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Let's Talk About It Grant Program" and complete the form. 

Incomplete applications will not be reviewed. Submission of an application does not guarantee approval. Deadline extensions will be considered on a case-by-case basis and only if the applicant has contacted staff prior to the application due date.

Participating Libraries Winter-Spring 2019

Let’s Talk About It is a joint project of the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Council operates the North Carolina Center for the Book, an affiliate program of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. The NC Center receives support from the State Library of North Carolina.     

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