Road Scholars

Road Scholars

As of July 14, 2020, the North Carolina Humanities Council retired the Road Scholars program.

The North Carolina Humanities Council thanks the many scholars who participated in this program and those who attended and supported this program with their gifts.

We believe that knowledge builds community and through our grant programs we will continue to embolden and encourage public humanities scholars and community organizations to work together to reimagine and create new public humanities programs that are community centric. Click here for more information and to learn if you are eligible for North Carolina Humanities Council grant opportunities.

If you have questions about scholar resources please contact our Executive Director, Sherry Paula Watkins at spwatkins@nchumanities.org and cc Executive Assistant Megan Byrd at mbyrd@nchumanities.org.

COVID-19 Update:  

Unfortunately, due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic the Council has canceled all Road Scholar Speakers Bureau events through October 31, 2020 and will not be offering rescheduling options. We recognize the difficulties that may result from canceled events and appreciate your flexibility, cooperation and understanding.

 

From 1990-2020 the North Carolina Humanities Council supported public humanities lectures for adults through our Road Scholars Speakers Bureau

Our Road Scholars program catalog explored the nuances of identity and community with presentations by over 60 speakers which focused on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Some lectures focused on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examined broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explored the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by hosts of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Gerald White Johnson (1890-1980), born in Riverton (near Wagram in Scotland County), was a giant among American scholars, friend and colleague of famous author H.L.

There are approximately seven million Muslims in the United States. These men and women come from all walks of life and from a range of ethnic and racial backgrounds. This presentation will help audiences better understand Islam in all...

Walk into any room full of people and ask how many know the language of film and virtually no one will raise their hand. But it is estimated that Americans spend a minimum of four and a half hours a day watching television. The fact is...

One hundred years ago, the Daughters of the American Revolution left for us all a legacy of patriotic commemoration—Daniel Boone’s Trail. During 1912-1915, the Daughters in North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky...

The Lost Colony is one of the great NC mysteries. History professor Dr. David LaVere’s research shows that when the English colonists who were left on Roanoke in 1587 disappeared, they tried to leave clues to their whereabouts. Though...

King Arthur, in the musical Camelot, heralds "Don't let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief, shining moment, that was known as Camelot."

Why is there such a large group of Cherokees in western North Carolina? Why weren’t they removed with the over 16,000 Cherokees that were moved to Indian Territory in the 1830s? This program looks at the origin and legal basis of the...

In this presentation audiences will be drawn in to the story of the American Revolution in the south. The talk on this campaign can focus on three principle areas from Jones’ book Before they were Heroes at King’s Mountain:

1....

In this presentation the audience will learn about the diversity of American Indian cultures in what is today North Carolina prior to European contact. The presentation provides an overview of an extensive period of cultural change,...