Road Scholars

Road Scholars

As of July 14, 2020, the North Carolina Humanities Council retired the Road Scholars program.

The North Carolina Humanities Council thanks the many scholars who participated in this program and those who attended and supported this program with their gifts.

We believe that knowledge builds community and through our grant programs we will continue to embolden and encourage public humanities scholars and community organizations to work together to reimagine and create new public humanities programs that are community centric. Click here for more information and to learn if you are eligible for North Carolina Humanities Council grant opportunities.

If you have questions about scholar resources please contact our Executive Director, Sherry Paula Watkins at spwatkins@nchumanities.org and cc Executive Assistant Megan Byrd at mbyrd@nchumanities.org.

COVID-19 Update:  

Unfortunately, due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic the Council has canceled all Road Scholar Speakers Bureau events through October 31, 2020 and will not be offering rescheduling options. We recognize the difficulties that may result from canceled events and appreciate your flexibility, cooperation and understanding.

 

From 1990-2020 the North Carolina Humanities Council supported public humanities lectures for adults through our Road Scholars Speakers Bureau

Our Road Scholars program catalog explored the nuances of identity and community with presentations by over 60 speakers which focused on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Some lectures focused on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examined broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explored the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by hosts of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Over the last 40 years, the South has experienced social and economic change at a dizzying pace. During this period, the South was transformed from a poor region that was still in many respects “the Nation’s number one economic problem...

Author and storyteller Jane Yolen states, “All humans are stories waiting to be told. My story, your story, our story—history.” In this program, Sylvia Payne encourages her audiences to realize that sometimes they may have shared...

The notion that America is a melting pot in which different ethnic and cultural groups lose their distinctions is under attack. Should our cultural diversity threaten our unity? America has always been a country of diverse peoples, and...

In this presentation Hardy will focus on the Civil War’s regional impact along the North Carolina-Tennessee board. In June 1864, East Tennessee Unionist George W. Kirk led a raid through the Toe River Valley and into Burke County, NC...

The American Civil War commands as much interest and intrigue today as it has since the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9, 1865.  Much of that interest lies in the enduring need, especially of Confederate...

Larry Reni Thomas is a veteran jazz writer/radio announcer/historian. This program consists of a series of interviews, stories and information about the Carolina jazz connection. It is a refreshing and entertaining way to answer...

Music is both an artistic and cultural product that allows groups and individuals to communicate identity, history and story. By examining the musical aesthetics and cultural context of a piece audiences today can appreciate the...

With its reputation as a “basketball state with a football problem,” sports remain a prominent aspect of life in the Tar Heel state. Generations of participants, spectators, fans and critics have debated its importance, and while some...

Amid the strife and upheaval in the American South of the 1920s, the 1929 Loray Mill Strike in Gastonia serves as an emblem of the violent textile labor disputes of the time. During this calamitous period, textile worker Ella May...

This talk provides an overview of the ethical issues and questions around Global Warming.  How can the traditions of ethics and philosophy help address these challenges?  How might we rethink our relationship to the...