Road Scholars

Road Scholars

Road Scholars Speakers Bureau Program COVID-19 Update:  

Unfortunately, due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic the Council has canceled all Road Scholar speakers bureau events through October 31, 2020 and will not be offering rescheduling options. We recognize the difficulties that may result from canceled events and appreciate your flexibility, cooperation and understanding.

We have also suspended new applications to host Road Scholar speakers bureau events until further notice. 

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures for adults which explore the nuances of identity and community.

Our Road Scholars program catalog includes presentations by over 60 speakers which focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars Program Guidelines for details on eligibility and expectations for host sites. Common program FAQs are listed here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. Please note, the Council is currently only accepting applications for events taking place between 11/1/19-10/31/20.

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions. Need a refresher on how to navigate your Applicant Dashboard? Click here for a video tour!

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below. We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and reports.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. You can watch this video to learn the steps to creating your account. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2020 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/19-10/31/20)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. You can watch this video to learn how to complete the online application form. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2020 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/19-10/31/20)" and complete the form.
  • New applicant? Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one phone consultations with Programs Coordinator Melissa Giblin to discuss the program and application process. Please click here to schedule a phone consultation.  

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

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